Dr. Liv Kismartoni

RapidBac™ Vet (RBV)

How long have you been using RapidBac™ Vet?

Dr. Liv

We've had the test at the clinic for about two years. Once I learned "when" (which cases) to use it, I, personally, have been using the RapidBac™ Vet test regularly for about a year. 

RBV

Why did you originally purchase RapidBac™ Vet?

Dr. Liv

The medical director at the clinic had heard about it and brought it up at rounds.  We discussed it and decided it would be a valuable tool at our vet clinic. 

RBV

Who in the clinic actually performs the test?

Dr. Liv

Our vet assistants and technicians.

RBV

Do you think that RapidBac™ Vet is a trustworthy alternative to microscopic urinalysis (or other methods) for detecting bacteriuria?

Dr. Liv

The RapidBac™ Vet test is much more sensitive than a urinalysis.  It is a culture without identifying the bacteria.  I think the best way to convince my colleagues would be to recommend they use it on the cases where they don't necessarily trust a negative on a urinalysis, to confirm a UTI has resolved, on a newly diagnosed diabetic/ renal disease/ Cushingoid patient, or to determine bacteriuria in a patient with dilute urine.

RBV

What do you do when you get a positive result with RapidBac™ Vet?

Dr. Liv

Unless this is an infection that has not responded to antibiotics, I will treat with antibiotics and retest with a RapidBac™ Vet after treatment.

If this is on a urine sample from a patient with a recent infection that has not resolved, or is recurrent, a culture and sensitivity to the lab is indicated.

RBV

What do you do when you get a negative result with RapidBac™ Vet?

Dr. Liv

I can trust the patient doesn't have a urinary tract infection. 

RBV

How do you use RapidBac™ Vet in cases of diabetic patients? 

Dr. Liv

I use RapidBac™ Vet as a screening tool for UTIs for diabetics (and anyone with a chronic disease that causes dilute urine).  It is not infrequent that I find silent UTIs by using this test; in fact, based on clinical signs, I suspected one of my diabetic patients had a UTI.  I left instructions in the medical record to run a RapidBac™ Vet test.  Since we had accidentally run out of RapidBac™ Vet tests, they ran a urinalysis in-house which did not show bacteria, or other evidence of a UTI (no WBCs, protein, nor blood).  I was fairly certain this patient did have a UTI, so since we were out of the in-house RapidBac™ Vet tests, I asked them to send in the urine for a culture and sensitivity to the lab.  They accidentally sent the urine in for a "urinalysis and culture & sensitivity 'if indicated'".  The result I received that same day was a negative urinalysis. I asked the technician to call the lab and request a culture and sensitivity, not a 'urinalysis and a C & S' if indicated’''.  They ran the culture and the urine did, in fact, grow E.coli.  I was able to treat the patient and resolve the clinical signs (which included problems with her glucose regulation).  This was an example of how I really needed RapidBac™ Vet in my clinic that day! 

RBV

Would you use RapidBac™ Vet in emergency/24-hour care? 

Dr. Liv

It is a very fast and trustworthy test for identifying bacteria in urine.  Much, much more sensitive than running a urinalysis in-house, or on the Sedivue (we also have a Sedivue in our clinic, and unfortunately at this time, can't trust the microscopy). 

RBV

What advice would you have for veterinarians who are considering RapidBac™ Vet?

Dr. Liv

The best recommendation I have is to put a note somewhere to remind you to use it when you first get it in the hospital.  I regret not figuring out its usefulness for a year! The RapidBac™ Vet is a very accurate and sensitive test to detect bacteria in urine. I run it in addition to urinalyses, as well as in place of them when I don't need all of the other information (and just need to know if my patient has bacteriuria).

About Dr. Liv

Dr. Liv earned her Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Public Health from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She graduated from the University of Wisconsin’s Veterinary School in 2010.

As a former professional dog trainer, and competitor in dog sports, she followed her passion and earned certifications in veterinary acupuncture at the Chi Institute, physical rehabilitation (similar to physical therapy for humans), and veterinary spinal manipulative therapy (animal chiropractic).
The responses and information provided by this site are not intended to constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment and should not be relied upon as a substitute for the clinical advice or care management by a treating veterinarian. The opinions expressed here are solely those of the contributors and not of SLRC.